[20-Apr-2012] Coldplay @ Rogers Arena, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Tash

clueing for looks
Coldplayer
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Coldplay combines music, theatrics at Rogers Arena

As some 12,000 music lovers entered Rogers Arena to see Coldplay in concert, attendants handed each patron a nylon wristband with little electronic gizmos on it. Having seen the group’s previous Vancouver concert, I was already excited in anticipation of what they’d do, how they’d present themselves; this group is renowned for not simply performing their music, but putting on a show that stimulates all the senses, using the whole building as their palette in creating a concert experience.

They did not disappoint. From the very second the band began to play, a multitude of multicolored fireflies lit up the arena – the “gizmos” on the wristbands contained little remote-controlled LEDs that flickered on and off at the control of the tour’s lighting operator. It was absolutely magical, and yet so simple an idea one wondered why we haven’t seen this before.

All the way from the stage to the furthest corners, the “room” became one and the same with these flickering lights, bringing everyone together in a rush of excitement. Suddenly the hockey arena that can sometimes feel cold and vast, felt like an intimate meadow in the band’s backyard. Truly electric, and at the same time quite organic in its feel, with living, moving audience members wearing the lighting.

Opening with the up-tempo “Mylo Xyloto” – title track of their latest album – and moving from that straight into “Hurts Like Heaven” from the same disc, the band hit the stage hard and continued rocking throughout the evening. Five minutes into the set Jonny Buckland’s jangling guitar riff on “In My Place” began a familiar refrain while confetti cannons burst all around Chris Martin as he led the crowd in sing-along, yes, five minutes in – confetti and a full out sing-along. The party was definitely on!
Large organic-looking video screens surrounded the audience, the biggest one over the stage looking like two giant vanilla wafers joined together – again a combination of high tech and organic. The camera shots were tight and close – heads only, hands only, sometimes waist-up shots – crisp, hi-def digital video, but the circular frame made them feel less like a TV screen and more like a continuously moving collage. The movement, the action, the tight editing brought you close to the band wherever you sat.

The audience was often almost as well lit as the performers onstage, but not with the aptly-named “blinders” that are so often used in concerts today. Here, most of the audience was bathed in the warm glow of a deep red wash. You could see and feel the presence of everyone in the space, and it was a warm enveloping light that brought us into the same space as the band. The red wash stayed on between many of the songs, rather than the stage going dark for the band to prep the next song. At times throughout the evening it felt like the stage and the audience were basking in a giant warm campfire. The use of lasers, fluorescent paint and other lighting effects were a great high-tech counterpoint to the intimate feeling and let us know this was still very much a rock concert – no Kumbayah would be sung around this campfire.

A few minutes into the evening, Chris Martin’s honest, gracious welcome included the acknowledgement of what it takes for a concert-goer to get out to a show – babysitters, driving downtown, finding and paying for parking, etc. – and his vow for the band to give 119% in their performance – hoping they’d give us everything we wanted and a little bit more. While it may sound cheesy in writing, when he said it you were certain he meant it. Later on in the concert when he shouted mid-song “We have the best f’ing job in the world,” you knew he was sincere.

Drummer Will Champion and bassist Guy Berryman maintained a solid groove throughout the band’s set. The band is a four-man unit, but there is no doubt that Chris Martin is the on-stage driving force in this group. Performing live he is completely engaging – with the build of a professional athlete and the energy of a court jester, he commands your attention throughout the evening – constantly moving, skipping from one ramp onstage to the next, at times falling onto his back to punctuate a song.
They play a solid set, and of course include their hits – “Yellow,” “Paradise,” “Charlie Brown” – each one with a unique accompanying lighting or stage effect. Black light and black and white images onscreen combine nicely to set the mood for “Violet Hill.” The group moved to a B-stage in the middle of the floor for a short “acoustic” three-song set – “Princess of China” (pre-recorded images of co-singer Rhianna appear onscreen), “Up in Flames” and “Warning Sign” – and later suddenly pop up at a C-stage set up in the middle of the stands halfway up the arena on the far end from the stage to sing “Us Against The World” before returning to the main stage to finish with a four-song closing segment and encore featuring “Clocks” and “Every Teardrop is a Waterfall.”

Coldplay is that perfect triple threat – a masterful mix of fine songwriting, engaging live performance, and the art of theatrical presentation – all done at the highest level of professionalism. Next time they’re back, be sure to get out there and be part of the experience.

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Tash

clueing for looks
Coldplayer
Joined
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Messages
42,923
Major Minus

[ame]www.youtube.com/watch?v=exR2FjP5mVo[/ame]
 

Tash

clueing for looks
Coldplayer
Joined
Sep 13, 2009
Messages
42,923
Some Coldplay fans duped after buying doctored tickets online

Some Coldplay fans are angry today after buying tickets on Craigslist for the band's weekend shows at Rogers Arena that turned out to be fake.

Emily Walcott of Maple Ridge says she resorted to Craigslist after tickets for the popular band's show sold out on Ticketmaster. The 19-year-old found a good deal online from a woman she says "seemed pretty nice". When she asked why the woman was selling the tickets for less than face value, Walcott was told it was because the ticket holder's job got complimentary passes to the show.

When Walcott arrived at the concert, her tickets wouldn't scan.

"We went to a different booth where (the usher) told me they were Photoshopped," she recalls. "I was really choked. I couldn't process anything that was going on."

Walcott says she went through a wave of emotions for believing that woman who sold them to her and ignoring the red flags. She was most upset that she was out $220 and wasn't able to see her favourite band. A report has been opened by Abbotsford police, who Walcott says were very nice to her.

"After I found out they were fake I was thinking, well at least I learned my lesson,'" she adds. "But then I was also thinking, why did I have to learn my lesson with Coldplay? I was really looking forward to it."

Abbotsford Police say they're not pleased. Cst. Ian MacDonald has heard from people claiming to be have been duped up to $400 because they ignored some major warning signs.

"[It was for] what they thought were prime seats," he says. "Instead they simply ended up finding transportation downtown and ultimately were turned away when they tried to get through the door."

He says crooks prey on emotions.

"Certainly, music concerts, need-to-see events, can create those emotions in people which causes them in many instances to pay more than ticket price value for an opportunity to see their favourite band and show," he says.

"For at least brief moments in time, they're willing to forgo what normally would be indicators that maybe this isn't a good idea for the hope they're going to get ideal seats for a concert that's in high demand."

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Abbotsford man arrested for alllegedly selling bogus Coldplay tickets

One man has been arrested after Abbotsford police, in a small sting operation, uncovered a scam selling bogus Coldplay concert tickets on Craigslist.

Police said they received five complaints in April from would-be concert goers who discovered their Coldplay tickets - selling online for more than $100 each - were fake. One complaint was also made for phony Madonna tickets.

A detective set up a meeting yesterday with a 24-year-old Abbotsford man claiming to be selling Madonna tickets online and the tickets were determined to be fraudulent. Const. Ian MacDonald said police expect fraud charges to be laid. No names have been released.

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