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If one-day I go criminally insane, I think I'd just hang out around college campuses, slitting those people's throats using a razor with 'Occam' scribbled across it in sharpie.

 

I totally got that without googling. :anxious:

 

I'm not gonna lie, I have a limited interest/knowledge in philosophy, mainly because its not an option in our schools and there isn't emphasis on it in this country whatsoever. But my experience of looking into it (Which involves looking at wiki pages and if I'm REALLY intrigued I actually click the references the wiki page is based on) the very basic questions to start off with are too vague to cause in-depth discussion or interesting debate, so I can imagine if you spend a lot of time studying it, seeing the same amateur questions from enlightened individuals must get very frustrating, especially as those kindof questions are initially what put people off philosophy,thus why you're gonna end up slashing people with a razor.

 

And that ink blot test suggested you're well adjusted, it really is a farce.

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What is the point of studying philosophy?

 

I'm not trying to be a bitch, I'm genuinely curious. I don't understand why you'd have/want/need to go to university and sit around and be tested on it. It's not something that has any objective measurements or anything. After university, what jobs would open up to you with a degree in it?

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:nod:

(Previous dream comment made me think of A Midsummer Night's Dream. Bleh. :facepalm:)

 

A few wise words from Oscar Wilde, "To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all."

This I understand. I could never question my existence, because then I would have to question the meaning of existence and would lose my mind.

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What is the point of studying philosophy?

 

I'm not trying to be a bitch, I'm genuinely curious. I don't understand why you'd have/want/need to go to university and sit around and be tested on it. It's not something that has any objective measurements or anything. After university, what jobs would open up to you with a degree in it?

 

Most of the people I know who study it are going to law school. Like me.

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What is the point of studying philosophy?

 

I'm not trying to be a bitch, I'm genuinely curious. I don't understand why you'd have/want/need to go to university and sit around and be tested on it. It's not something that has any objective measurements or anything. After university, what jobs would open up to you with a degree in it?

 

My brother has a PH.D in it, and currently has a position at Arkansas University. In all frankness, the most you can usually do is teach at the university level (and be an interesting/enlightened human being I suppose :shrug: ), though phil minors look really good with law and business degrees, and if you're religious and into theology/ministry, it's also a benefit.

 

So no, it doesn't have much economic/pragmatic benefit.

 

But..most people want/need to study it in universities because they have a passionate, invested interest in the importance of a certain perspectives, issues, and universities are usually the only place one can be in an environment/community devoted to the intense research/discussion of particular philosophical ideas.

 

I would disagree with regard to your saying that 'it doesn't have any objective measurements or anything'. It's not a purely empirical science, but every modern philosopher, in presenting an argument is required to give a rigorous logical syllogism of that idea's development. As a result of this type of system, there are innumerous ideas that philosophers do deem objectively incorrect and unsound, as they do not abide by the principles of sufficient reason.

 

Now, it often feels like a stagnant practice because, for one, society doesn't really care about the latest refutation of Kripke or Shoemaker, even if it does affect the decisions people make (it is relevant to everyday actions whether or not free will is compatible with determinism; if act consequentialism is better than rule consequentialism etc.) b. Many philosophy majors are more enamored with academica itself, than actually pursuing the ethical actions attached to their ideas. There's a certain hypocrisy in highlighting the ignorance of society, and then paying tens of thousands of dollars to an institution only to become a hedonistic professor who devotes his or her time to esoteric subjects, while ironically giving little to society. When in reality, philosophical enquiry has large import on the fields of psychology, law, politics etc. and should probably be done for the sake of those types of ends, rather than the label of 'philosophy professor'.

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