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Keyboard Vs Piano


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Hey, so I want to start learning either the keyboard or the piano along with the drum but I can't decide which to learn.

1. If I learn one would I be able to play the other?

2. Which is best to start on?

3. If I go for a keyboard, how many keys should I go for?

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1. As long as the keyboard has a decent action (realistically weighted keys) you should be able to make a transition to the piano, it may not be seamless, but you would get the hang of it quicker than if you were playing a keyboard without weighted keys.

 

2. No right or wrong answer here, it depends on how much you're willing to spend, how much space you have, how many people you live with, etc. If you have a ton of space and have some money, you can't beat the sound of an acoustic but there are definite drawbacks (very heavy, must be tuned, no volume control other than key dynamics). Digital pianos have come along way and may be a better option for somebody starting out and undecided if they will stick with the instrument. I started really small, on some unweighted keyboard with less than 50 keys.

 

3. 88.

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1. As long as the keyboard has a decent action (realistically weighted keys) you should be able to make a transition to the piano, it may not be seamless, but you would get the hang of it quicker than if you were playing a keyboard without weighted keys.

 

2. No right or wrong answer here, it depends on how much you're willing to spend, how much space you have, how many people you live with, etc. If you have a ton of space and have some money, you can't beat the sound of an acoustic but there are definite drawbacks (very heavy, must be tuned, no volume control other than key dynamics). Digital pianos have come along way and may be a better option for somebody starting out and undecided if they will stick with the instrument. I started really small, on some unweighted keyboard with less than 50 keys.

 

3. 88.

Thanks a bunch :dazzled:. I think I'll start on a digital piano. I'm 17 now, is it too late to start learning?

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Completely agree with Coldplayfan1294!

 

I started out on a Yamaha B2 Upright piano.

There was a possibility for me to 'rent' it for a monthly share and once you shared the full price of the piano, you become the owner of it.

 

This piano was amazing and the sound was superb.

It contained a little very cool system called 'SilentPiano', which can change it into a digital piano using the center pedal.

This system works very well and the sound is as good as identical acoustic as 'silent'.

 

After a year or 2 I decided to swap it up for the Yamaha Clavinova CLP 320 as the size is way smaller, it's also possible to take it apart.

This piano his fully digital and even has some different built-in sounds and effects.

I found that the sound was as good, and even better, than the B2 and the keyboard was identical (88 weighted keys, no difference at all).

It has built-in speakers and also MIDI connections so you can use it for way more than 'just' piano.

 

Nowadays I don't have a piano anymore as I owe a KeyRig 49 MIDI keyboard.

Via software I can get any piano possible to imagine and even change it up to something totally different. I use it to create whole songs without using anything besides the KeyRig (and my bassguitar).

 

Sorry for the whole story, but I think that it could inspire you to make a good decision based on my experience with different kind of pianos.

 

So what I would advice is to look for a descent digital or stage piano with at least the features described above. For a few hundred euros/dollars you'll be able to find something good.

 

To answer your questions:

1. Try to find a descent stage piano, they are more compact than an upright or digital piano.

2. Digital or stage with at least MIDI functionality. Via software you'd be able to do things that a keyboard could do.

3. The best answer here is: As many as possible. 49 keys would be OK but more is advised tot start with.

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Completely agree with Coldplayfan1294!

 

I started out on a Yamaha B2 Upright piano.

There was a possibility for me to 'rent' it for a monthly share and once you shared the full price of the piano, you become the owner of it.

 

This piano was amazing and the sound was superb.

It contained a little very cool system called 'SilentPiano', which can change it into a digital piano using the center pedal.

This system works very well and the sound is as good as identical acoustic as 'silent'.

 

After a year or 2 I decided to swap it up for the Yamaha Clavinova CLP 320 as the size is way smaller, it's also possible to take it apart.

This piano his fully digital and even has some different built-in sounds and effects.

I found that the sound was as good, and even better, than the B2 and the keyboard was identical (88 weighted keys, no difference at all).

It has built-in speakers and also MIDI connections so you can use it for way more than 'just' piano.

 

Nowadays I don't have a piano anymore as I owe a KeyRig 49 MIDI keyboard.

Via software I can get any piano possible to imagine and even change it up to something totally different. I use it to create whole songs without using anything besides the KeyRig (and my bassguitar).

 

Sorry for the whole story, but I think that it could inspire you to make a good decision based on my experience with different kind of pianos.

 

So what I would advice is to look for a descent digital or stage piano with at least the features described above. For a few hundred euros/dollars you'll be able to find something good.

 

To answer your questions:

1. Try to find a descent stage piano, they are more compact than an upright or digital piano.

2. Digital or stage with at least MIDI functionality. Via software you'd be able to do things that a keyboard could do.

3. The best answer here is: As many as possible. 49 keys would be OK but more is advised tot start with.

Well I have a max budget of £400 for the piano so hopefully I should be able to get something good.

 

What should I consider when looking for a teacher? All the smart looking ones that are based in posher areas are really expensive. I'm unsure about going for the ones in my area.

 

Sent from my SM-A300FU using Coldplaying mobile app

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For that budget you can get the http://www.thomann.de/gb/yamaha_p_45_b.htm (Yamaha P 45) stage piano inc. shipping for £ 354.24!

 

If you go on that same website (http://www.thomann.de/gb/keys.html) you can find different amount of great keyboards and pianos that fit very well within that budget! I advice you to just sniff around and check the samples that most products have on the website.

 

I bought plenty of things from them and never had any troubles. Don't know about the importation for your country tho, you could contact them maybe about that, you wouldn't be the first one asking!

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