Jump to content
🛒 SHOP THE NEW CHRISTMAS LIGHTS COLLECTION 🛒
gai

Everyday Life - press/reviews

Recommended Posts

Grammy nominations for 2019 are announced tomorrow (20th). So unless Everyday Life can be nominated despite coming out 2 days after, and LP9 comes out next year and is also grammy-worthy, then we could potentially see TWO Coldplay albums receiving nominations at the 2021 Grammy's! Hahaha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grammy nominations for 2019 are announced tomorrow (20th). So unless Everyday Life can be nominated despite coming out 2 days after, and LP9 comes out next year and is also grammy-worthy, then we could potentially see TWO Coldplay albums receiving nominations at the 2021 Grammy's! Hahaha

Not possible for EL to be eligible for the next Grammys. They are pretty strict on that.

 

Best chance is 2021 which doesn’t bode well for the album cause Adele will ruin everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not possible for EL to be eligible for the next Grammys. They are pretty strict on that.

 

Best chance is 2021 which doesn’t bode well for the album cause Adele will ruin everything.

 

So you're saying if Everyday Life isn't nominated tomorrow then it can't be nominated next year? Really? Wow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you're saying if Everyday Life isn't nominated tomorrow then it can't be nominated next year? Really? Wow.

If it’s nominated tomorrow, it’ll be for the 2020 Grammys - which is impossible as they missed the deadline.

 

But it’s eligible for nomination for the 2021 Grammys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here you go, seems like a 5/5 review. Probably the first official rating from press or did I miss something?

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/what-to-listen-to/coldplay-everyday-life-review-16-heart-on-sleeve-songs-one-greatest/

 

This article is paywalled for me -- can anyone share the review here?

 

And bummer if they miss the grammy's deadline, because if LP9 comes out in 2020 then they'd have two albums eligible for grammy noms which would be really, really weird.

 

 

Real talk: I touched upon this before in other posts, but what effect does do press/other reviews have on your own feelings?

 

Personally, I don't let reviews really effect my subjective enjoyment. At this point, I already have made up my mind after listening to EL 10 times. That said though, I can let reviews sway my objective perspectives, if that makes sense.

 

Like for SJLT, I subjectively don't like the song. But objectively, seeing so many people seriously love it and jam out to it helps make me enjoy it a tiny bit more.

 

On the other hand, I love GS, but I read a lot of reviews that pointed out much of the instrumentation feels sterile and the lyrics hardly have much bite, and I couldn't help but agree.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Telegraph Review:

 

Singing with gentle sorrow about repression, conflict and racism on the mellifluous Trouble in Town, Coldplay frontman Chris Martin interrupts his litany of despair to softly proclaim: “Oh my goodness, there’s blood on the beat.” It may be the politest and most English cri de coeur ever laid down on record, and yet no less effective for it. Perhaps because goodness is at the very heart of Coldplay, a band who believe in the power of music to uplift and transform, who play as if they can save the world with a melody.

As the quartet deftly change gear, opening out into a wild, free-flowing jazzy tumble beneath a news recording of an aggressive US policeman, the effect is gripping and devastating, because it feels like the politest band on earth being pushed to the very end of their tether.

Like their heroes U2, Coldplay are so utterly sincere and entirely lacking in the couldn’t-give-a-damn posturing that passes for coolness in rock culture, you sometimes feel you have to apologise for liking them. Which is ridiculous given all they have achieved.

They are one of the greatest British bands of this century, and certainly the most popular. Starting with Parachutes in 2000, Coldplay have released seven multi-million selling albums, their atmospheric and emotional singalong anthems filling stadiums. But where do you go when you are already one of the biggest bands in the world? Even bigger is not always better.

 

Everyday Life is a double album, 16 songs spread over 53 minutes, with the first half titled Sunrise and the second Sunset. Doubles can be a risky format, hinting at self-indulgence and lack of editorial control. Yet the extra running length can also provide breathing space for musicians to experiment outside their usual parameters, classic examples being the Beatles’ White Album, London Calling by the Clash and (less successfully) U2 on Rattle and Hum.

 

Everyday Life belongs on this hallowed ground. It feels organic, analogue and playful as Coldplay dip into different musical genres, trying their hands at choral, classical, gospel, blues, folk, African funk and a blissful slice of doo wop on Cry Cry Cry, with Martin pitched against his own varispeed falsetto.

It is often rough around the edges, linked by snatches of field recordings, with a feel of real instruments being played rather than swept up in panoramic pop productions. Nevertheless, there is just enough to maintain Coldplay’s sense of epic grandeur on a handful of widescreen anthems.

Church, Orphans, Champion of the World and the title track use a broad spread of world music influences to reinforce key messages of empathy, unity and shared humanity in times of trouble, when “everyone dreams and everyone doubts/ Got to keep dancing when the lights go out.”

 

It is, as ever, heart-on-sleeve stuff, with all of Coldplay’s musical diversions bound together by Martin’s golden gift for melody, almost simplistically direct lyrics and emotive crooning. But, oh my goodness, you’d have to be made of sterner stuff than I to resist.

 

Everyday Life is released by Columbia on November 22

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Thanks!

 

Good review and I totally agree. It's hard to deny the rawness and simplicity of Everyday Life and I'm glad this reviewer appreciated that having lots of genres kept the album strong. We'll see what others think.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Coldplay's highest rated album in Pitchfork is Mylo. They even destroyed AROBTTH and Parachutes.

Although I consult the site every week, I am not really expecting a fair assessment from Pitchfork since they have a against-mainstream bias.

 

I ignore Pitchfork at this point. Their superiority is exhausting and I don't get how anybody can look at their reviews and legitimately think that they're worthwhile.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Telegraph Review:

 

Singing with gentle sorrow about repression, conflict and racism on the mellifluous Trouble in Town, Coldplay frontman Chris Martin interrupts his litany of despair to softly proclaim: “Oh my goodness, there’s blood on the beat.” It may be the politest and most English cri de coeur ever laid down on record, and yet no less effective for it. Perhaps because goodness is at the very heart of Coldplay, a band who believe in the power of music to uplift and transform, who play as if they can save the world with a melody.

As the quartet deftly change gear, opening out into a wild, free-flowing jazzy tumble beneath a news recording of an aggressive US policeman, the effect is gripping and devastating, because it feels like the politest band on earth being pushed to the very end of their tether.

Like their heroes U2, Coldplay are so utterly sincere and entirely lacking in the couldn’t-give-a-damn posturing that passes for coolness in rock culture, you sometimes feel you have to apologise for liking them. Which is ridiculous given all they have achieved.

They are one of the greatest British bands of this century, and certainly the most popular. Starting with Parachutes in 2000, Coldplay have released seven multi-million selling albums, their atmospheric and emotional singalong anthems filling stadiums. But where do you go when you are already one of the biggest bands in the world? Even bigger is not always better.

 

Everyday Life is a double album, 16 songs spread over 53 minutes, with the first half titled Sunrise and the second Sunset. Doubles can be a risky format, hinting at self-indulgence and lack of editorial control. Yet the extra running length can also provide breathing space for musicians to experiment outside their usual parameters, classic examples being the Beatles’ White Album, London Calling by the Clash and (less successfully) U2 on Rattle and Hum.

 

Everyday Life belongs on this hallowed ground. It feels organic, analogue and playful as Coldplay dip into different musical genres, trying their hands at choral, classical, gospel, blues, folk, African funk and a blissful slice of doo wop on Cry Cry Cry, with Martin pitched against his own varispeed falsetto.

It is often rough around the edges, linked by snatches of field recordings, with a feel of real instruments being played rather than swept up in panoramic pop productions. Nevertheless, there is just enough to maintain Coldplay’s sense of epic grandeur on a handful of widescreen anthems.

Church, Orphans, Champion of the World and the title track use a broad spread of world music influences to reinforce key messages of empathy, unity and shared humanity in times of trouble, when “everyone dreams and everyone doubts/ Got to keep dancing when the lights go out.”

 

It is, as ever, heart-on-sleeve stuff, with all of Coldplay’s musical diversions bound together by Martin’s golden gift for melody, almost simplistically direct lyrics and emotive crooning. But, oh my goodness, you’d have to be made of sterner stuff than I to resist.

 

Everyday Life is released by Columbia on November 22

Thanks for posting the review! Good review to start with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.thelineofbestfit.com/reviews/albums/coldplay-everyday-life-album-review

 

8/10 from the lineofbestfit dot com!

Reviews so far looking good.

 

Line Of Best Fit REVIEW:

 

On an expansive, emotional, epic gauntlet, Coldplay are a far cry from the band who rang in this decade, and they’re all the better for it.

 

The name Coldplay has become synonymous with a push and pull dichotomy. Over their extensive, and let's be frank, impressive career where they've gone from sad college boys to multi-Glastonbury headliners who can take any stadium and sell it out; the road travelled has been one rife with critique.

 

Eight years ago Coldplay became a band completely entrenched in constructing an immovable fortress of mainstream choruses, after making their name as indie everymen. They started this decade with a bold move into a bombastic idea runway; filled with bright colours and Beyoncé guest spots.

 

And they're ending it with a cinematic sonic scape that pitches everything from driven folk, gospel, wild jazz sax solos, and indie sincerity. Split into two parts, Sunrise and Sunset; Everyday Life is as much a concept about the complex natures of humanity as it is a way for Coldplay to delve into their reserved pulse.

 

Even for a band that have held emotional substance heart-on-sleeve, opening the Sunrise half of the album with a poignant string arrangement is a bit 'on the nose'. Still, given that what it opens is the gates to a sprawling cinematic adventure, it does feel somewhat fitting.

 

"Church" is where the pulse quickens and undulating synths creep upward, it all feels like the world waking, and this is ultimately the message that Everyday Life delivers. The pieces that make up the puzzle. The most explosive of which, "Arabesque" rife with horn-laden crescendos erupt with a rattling battalion of noise.

 

One of the most emotionally drawing moments; digging deep into the psyche of the trauma that can come from an absent parent, the dry, piano-led "Daddy", a ballad of a child yearning for its father.

 

And then they bust out "When I Need A Friend" which goes full choral, aided by atmospheric rain as the apt Sunrise closer. Given it's a two-act play, the end of the first half, while suited, seems a natural closer to the entire spectacle but kicking off round two, "Guns" is a fast-paced acoustic-driven folk number that has a heart of wide-eyed disbelief at the state of the world.

 

Sunset is where things fall to a quieter timbre, but the humanitarian exploration is far from flat. On "Champion Of The World"; a vast sounding, nineties drawn-out cut, Coldplay touches upon romance.

 

Rounding everything off, the titular closer holds a house of mirrors up to the life of both Chris Martin, Coldplay, and the world, and roots the subdued grandiosity of the seventeen tracks before it in a simple idea that asks the question - how? How do we survive as a species in a world we want to destroy, how do we love when we hurt, how do we see when the lights are off? Big questions after having gone through a previous seventeen tracks.

 

At times it can feel like the party's over, especially given the full focus Coldplay have had over the years on pivoting from euphoric BBC-sporting-moment-highlight instrumental from sad-boy piano indie. Still, if you can get over the fact that the cannon of coloured powder are nowhere to be seen, then the results are rewarding.

 

Coldplay are a band who explore. Be it the origins of their emotional landscape, or the shallow depths of the mainstream world or even the actual vibrancy; every effort has been made to create an audible spectacle. And gaze on as a band who've evolved into an unstoppable entity carry on their organic exploration.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone read the review from musicOMH already? Thought there might be some country or timezone restrictions or something, because I couldn't open The Line of Best Fit's review either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This guy does a lot of Coldplay reviews and has a pretty large following for a YT music critic channel. I agree with a lot of his sentiments and disagree with some others. Worth a watch (will spoil album if you haven't listened yet)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NME review (4/5)

 

Coldplay – ‘Everyday Life’ review: a confounding experiment from a deceptively forward-thinking band

 

 

Chris Martin and co. take on heady themes of love, war, racism, faith, gun control, friendship, climate change, police brutality and more. This inventive eighth album is proof that Coldplay are more adventurous than they're often given credit for

 

“Every day is great and every day is terrible,” said Chris Martin in a recent interview. “There’s a lot of trouble, but there’s also so much positivity”. The statement was a departure from the Coldplay frontman’s recently optimistic view of the world; the kind of ‘posi-vibes’ electronic pop that characterised much of his band’s last album, 2015’s ‘A Head Full Of Dreams’. In 2019, Martin has acknowledged that the world isn’t always, ahem, “yellow”. It can, in fact, be quite shit.

 

Step forward Coldplay’s eighth record: a double-album comprised of ‘Sunrise’ (part one) and ‘Sunset’ (part two), which veers frequently between the topical and timeless highs and lows of love, war, racism, faith, gun control, friendship, climate change and police brutality. It’s an unflinching contemplation on the state of the world, armed with some of the band’s most experimental and uncharacteristic music since 2008’s ‘Viva La Vida’.

 

 

Opener “Sunrise” does set the tone beautifully, however, with a major/minor string arrangement that could be from a war film soundtrack – not the work of one of the planet’s biggest bands. The lead violin plays an at once mournful and hopeful timbre: a perfect representation of Martin’s note on the duality of good and bad.

 

What follows is the album’s best track. ‘Church’ is Coldplay 101: a moving, ambient, transcendental piece of pop music. As Martin digs into his usual adventurist metaphors (“When you’re setting your sail / Oh can I be your seventh sea”) his crystalline falsetto is met with swells of strings, cascading guitar arpeggios and avian trip-hop breakbeats. Norah Shaqur, meanwhile, makes for a stunning guest spot singing in Arabic verse. “I worship in your church, baby, always,” may signal the particular spiritual sanctuary afforded that Martin’s love offers him, but the meeting of Eastern and Western sounds alludes to a globalised acceptance of different religions.

 

That broad church perspective becomes a common thread of ‘Everyday Life’. The religious opinions of his bandmates Jonny Buckland (guitar), Guy Berryman (bass) and Will Champion (drums) remain unknown, but it’s worth noting that Martin has spoken openly about omnism (treating all religions as equal). And he doesn’t hide from it in ‘Everyday Life’. On the hushed, acoustic folk song ‘WOTW/POTP’ he sings of “a world gone wrong”, where he “shall be strong / […] My faith is strong”.

 

Elsewhere, on ‘BrokEn’, the band enlists a gospel choir for a stripped-back, finger-clicking piano number (“Oh the Lord will shine a light on me”). ‘When I Need A Friend’ plays out like a modern hymn, with the London Voices Choir accompanying Martin’s sombre chants of “Holy, Holy / Dark defend / Shield and should me”.

 

Later, on Sunset’s ‘Cry Cry Cry’ Martin references Jizo Bodhisattva, an enlightened being revered primarily in east Asian Buddhism. But this loungey rhythm and blues number, which interpolates Garnet Mimms and the Enchanters’ 1963 hit ‘Cry Baby’, is one of the few religious-tinged tracks that has something actually musically interesting about it. At first, Martin’s pitch-shifted chipmunk wails, partnered with his own raw vocals, appear gratuitous. Yet they morph gradually into an endearing, catchy doo-wop accompaniment.

 

 

The strengths of ‘Everyday Life’ instead lie in the band’s musical left turns and lyrical experiments. Sunrise’s ‘Trouble In Town’ is a searing indictment of police brutality and systemic racism (“Trouble in town / Because they hung my brother brown / […] Blood on the beat”). A recording of misconduct by US law enforcement precedes a visceral crescendo of ‘A Rush of Blood To The Head’-era piano rock, with Buckland’s reverb guitar signatures clashing with detuned synths.

 

‘Arabesque’ is another highlight. It’s one of Coldplay’s most atypical songs, Nigerian brass arrangements blasting over a hulking, psychedelic prog-rock backbone. Three generations of the Kuti family appear on the record – so does Palestinian oud group Le Trio Joubran and Belgian superstar singer Stromae – which makes for a fittingly globetrotting record that espouses unity in the human race (“we share the same blood”). It’s accompanying A-side single – and the album’s centrepiece – ‘Orphans’, details hope amid the bleak narrative of the Syrian civil war. It’s the album’s obvious lead single, with its slinky bassline, syncopated Afrobeat percussion and spirited choral sing-a-longs. On the other hand, we had our fill of “woops” and “woo-hoos” across the band’s ‘A Head Full of Dreams’. You’re tempted to think: Please, no more.

 

 

Thankfully, penultimate track ‘Champion of the World’ (which uses the emotive guitar hook from ‘Los Angeles, Be Kind’, the work of the late Scott Huchison’s Owl John side project) rescues an otherwise trailing part two of ‘Everyday Life’. It’s a slow-burning ballad dedicated to believing in yourself, replete with the widescreen indie rock flair reminiscent of Doves’ ‘There Goes The Fear’. The closing title track, with its blooming strings and repeated chants of “Hallelujah”, sets you up for a ‘Fix You’-style cry fest but slightly short-circuits the whole thing. Still, it’s an interesting decision for a band that trades in build-and-release euphoric pop – and maybe that’s the point.

 

Ultimately, ‘Everyday Life’ is something of a confounding experiment.

 

On the one hand it’s full of eclectic sounds and ideas – an Iranian poem interlude here (‘Bani Adam’), a country-blues musing on gun control there (‘Guns’) – that offer a welcome respite from Coldplay tropes. True, these songs are sometimes more exciting in theory than in practise (not something you’d have said of, for instance, the Brian Eno-assisted ‘Viva La Vida’), but ‘Everyday Life’ regularly steps to the left-field, proving that Coldplay are more adventurous than they’re often given credit for.

 

 

Read more at https://www.nme.com/reviews/album/coldplay-everyday-life-review#OrhuLiXsFSV8cfUD.99

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn. Was hoping NME would at least go 4.5 stars, given they gave AHFOD a 4...

 

Different reviewers I suppose. Looks like this reviewer only took issue with the less experimental parts on the album? But like what do the other band members religions have to do with the music? Idk man just give it 5 stars. It's that good and I am gonna be bummed I'd this gets a similar meta-score to AHFOD because *ahem* it's way better and more thoughtful.

 

Also this is one of those reviews that's like "everything is so thoughtful and amazing but that one song sounded too much like annoying Coldplay so therefore I deduct one entire star." I wish there was more justification. Sure, don't like orphans, but what about the piano on Bani Adam or the beautiful Old Friends?

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn. Was hoping NME would at least go 4.5 stars, given they gave AHFOD a 4...

 

Different reviewers I suppose. Looks like this reviewer only took issue with the less experimental parts on the album? But like what do the other band members religions have to do with the music? Idk man just give it 5 stars. It's that good and I am gonna be bummed I'd this gets a similar meta-score to AHFOD because *ahem* it's way better and more thoughtful.

 

Also this is one of those reviews that's like "everything is so thoughtful and amazing but that one song sounded too much like annoying Coldplay so therefore I deduct one entire star." I wish there was more justification. Sure, don't like orphans, but what about the piano on Bani Adam or the beautiful Old Friends?

Yeah AHFOD and everyday life getting the same 4/5 is disappointing.. I feel like the AHFOD's inflated rating (imo) may have had something to do with Coldplay getting their god like genius award not long after.

Either way, was expecting higher from nme. I have a feeling that ratings might suffer from reviews by one time album listeners.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guardian (3/5)

 

Coldplay: Everyday Life review – surefire hits and dodgy experiments

 

The band’s new double album mixes more of their melodically watertight stadium pop with dabblings in the genres they are least suited to dabble in

 

 

The internal psychology of rock bands is a tricky thing for outsiders to fathom but, 21 years on from their debut single, it’s pretty clear Coldplay are driven by two often conflicting impulses. The first is to be the biggest band in the world, a desire that was evident from the start in their amenable, uncontroversial songs dealing in generalities and emotions expressed so vaguely that anyone could relate to them. This instinct made them impressively adaptable, and when guitar rock’s currency crashed, they slipped easily into co-writes with Avicii and pop super-producers Stargate, and arranged guest appearances from Rihanna and the Chainsmokers.

 

The other is an impulse to experiment. One suspects it’s not something to which Coldplay are naturally suited – invited to compile a streaming service playlist of influences, they opted for pub jukebox crowd-pleasers by Bob Marley, Oasis and REM – but they keep giving it a go, tapping up electronic auteurs Brian Eno and Jon Hopkins for ideas, and releasing concept albums and pseudonymous dabblings in African music.

 

Balancing continued vast commercial success with something more exploratory is tough to do. U2 pulled it off on Achtung Baby and Zooropa, but have spent the ensuing 25 years trying to remember how. On Everyday Life, Coldplay use the breadth of a double album to try again.

 

 

The straightforwardly Coldplay-esque moments sound more straightforward and Coldplay-esque than ever. Only the hazy synth washes of Church tilt towards the more electronic direction of Mylo Xyloto and Ghost Stories. The rest could have come from 2005’s X&Y: U2-ish guitars chime plangently, pianos strike melancholy chords, choruses soar into lighters-out uplift. It’s all melodically watertight, but the things that traditionally annoy people about Coldplay are there too, not least the sense that there’s something too steely and deliberate about their desire to get stadium crowds swaying along. Orphans even nicks the “Woo-woo” refrain from Sympathy for the Devil, which, as craven bids for audience participation go, seems one stop short of halting the song and shouting: “Oggy oggy oggy.”

 

The lyrical vagueness seems less lovable than ever because the songs generally deal with sociopolitical matters. Until they tack a recording of an incident of racist police harassment on to Trouble in Town, its vague lyrics about the “system that keeps you down” could be interpreted as being about anything from the patriarchy to taxation to the liberal media. The title track, meanwhile, offers a bit of hand-wringing about the state of the world that concludes, as someone else once did, that there are a lot of very fine people on both sides.

 

 

Far better are a couple of acoustic tracks with genuine emotional heft. Daddy’s drawing of disrupted paternal relations is really affecting, perhaps because it homes in on the kind of telling detail – “Look, dad, we’ve got the same hair” – Chris Martin usually ignores in favour of the widescreen image. You could suggest Guns contains a hint of equivocation – “Everything’s gone so crazy … maybe I’m crazy too” – but by contrast with the rest of Coldplay’s oeuvre, it’s like something off Flux of Pink Indians’ The Fucking Cunts Treat Us Like Pricks: a splenetic, foul-mouthed burst of rage and bewildered despair.

 

The rest of the album is given over to experiments, with varying degrees of success. Whatever you make of the lyrics of Èkó, which seem indebted to Paul Simon’s Under African Skies, its tumbling, Mali-influenced guitars are irresistible. The instrumentals Sunrise and Bani Adam are pleasant if inconsequential. Arabesque isn’t much of a song but the desert-bluesy groove is nice enough and the blasts of free-blowing sax carry a certain element of surprise.

 

But the dabblings in gospel (Broken) and bluesy doo-wop (Cry Cry Cry) seem like the result of a long and fruitful search to pinpoint the genres in which Coldplay are least suited to dabbling. The inclusion of WOTW/POTP is baffling. There are plenty of reasons to include a demo recording on an album: if it captures an unrepeatable moment of inspiration or a raw performance impossible to replicate in the studio. But WOTW/POTP does neither. It rambles aimlessly, it stops and starts, then finally collapses with Chris Martin muttering “I haven’t finished that one yet”, to which the obvious response is: “Why don’t you get back to us when you have, mate?”

 

No more mellow Yellow: why Coldplay are pop's weirdest band

Of course, it’s there as a signifier: that’s right, we’re Coldplay – one of the biggest bands in the world – and we’ve thrown caution to the wind. It’s a laudable intention, but Everyday Life is wildly uneven, held together only by its thematic obsession with religion: disc one (Sunrise) literally ends with a hymn, disc two (Sunset) with Chris Martin singing “Alleluia, alleluia”. You lose count of the references to God, church and prayer in between. What this signifies remains a mystery: has Chris Martin, a lapsed Christian, rediscovered his faith? Is it intended more in the vein of Nick Cave’s recent line about how “it doesn’t matter whether God exists or not – we must reach as if he does”? The answer remains elusive. As, alas, does the balance between world-beating commercialism and experimentation.

 

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/nov/21/coldplay-everyday-life-review-parlophone-chris-martin

  • Angry 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guardian (3/5)

 

Arabesque isn’t much of a song but the desert-bluesy groove is nice enough and the blasts of free-blowing sax carry a certain element of surprise.

 

Say what now????

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Although everyone has their right for opinion, then some reviews often give me the feeling, that reviewers are trying waaaaay too much to show-off their position as music critic and their "talents" to write smartass sophisticated crap. :laughing: But that's what they're paid for - to provoke controversy. Still, most of reviews are nice to read.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guardian (3/5)

 

Arabesque isn’t much of a song but the desert-bluesy groove is nice enough and the blasts of free-blowing sax carry a certain element of surprise.

 

Your rating doesn’t mean shit if you think Arabesque isn’t MUCH OF A SONG.

 

And you call yourselves music critics. Smh.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a good review, gaurdian. Such a double standard. Any other band or pop group that has political lyrics or dabbles in other genres ( the 1975) gets a ton of praise but Coldplay apparently doesn't get to or it's not specific enough or appropriative...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm only interested in Pitchfork's review, to be honest. Even if they don't like Coldplay there's always something interesting in the way they see the band . I can see them rating Everyday Life less than a 6 out of 10 (I'll be surprised if they rate it more than that).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...