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Aurora the lost planet / forgotten song


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Something's been bothering me and i'm sure lots of us...

As per the leaflet (the map of the Spheres) AND the artwork cover show, there is a 13th sphere called Aurora, the tiny blue one.

Coldplay - Music of the Spheres

(on the same line as Utra and Infinity Station)

According to the leaftlet and to the cards that people have been getting from the special box set, they created a dedicated alien language for this one as for all.

Based on a thorough investigation (5 minutes of squinting my eyes at this lol) it seems to translate to "Aurow1"..

But the album only features 12 songs, without any hidden track. The booklet with all the credits do not mention Aurora/Aurow1 at all either.

We also know that the Japanese bonus track supposedly is a version of Higher Power, not a new track.

Therefore a question remains : WHERE is Aurora?

Is it a song that nearly made it to the album but was eventually discarded (Car Kids 2.0 which would fit with the Mylo Xylotwo theme of this era lol) ?

Is it a hint towards Vol2??

Maybe it was supposed to be on Vol1 and will be on Vol2? Is it a different project and was never an actual song?

What are your theories? :smart:

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my theory is that Aurora will be on vol.2, maybe associated to an instrumental called MOTS III... my guess is that there will be new songs for the same planets but instead of the neon moons we will have this little blue planet

hopefully they will break the silence soon on the volumes stuff with the album out!

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ok this is completely pulled out of thin air, but can anyone who has the CD and a good CD player or a laptop with a CD drive (does that still exist) and the right software check if there's a hidden track before track 1? As in, a track 0. Play track 1 and keep pressing rewind immediately.

 

edit: if would fit with the "lost" planet actually. Lost "outside" the regular track list. omg what if

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23 hours ago, Captain Crieff said:

ok this is completely pulled out of thin air, but can anyone who has the CD and a good CD player or a laptop with a CD drive (does that still exist) and the right software check if there's a hidden track before track 1? As in, a track 0. Play track 1 and keep pressing rewind immediately.

 

edit: if would fit with the "lost" planet actually. Lost "outside" the regular track list. omg what if

Unfortunately I think people have already tried that

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I don't have th retail disc yet, but it might be a pre-emphasis track before or after the end of the album or even a track hidden in the data partition of the disc.

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21 hours ago, nowayme said:

I don't have th retail disc yet, but it might be a pre-emphasis track before or after the end of the album or even a track hidden in the data partition of the disc.

@Coeurli put it in EAC and got this, all looks normal right?

image.png.dca476b3f33adef94bedc59f008f72f2.png

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the guy that worked with Coldplay for the emoji symbols answered questions using emojis... he symbolized aurora coming out of a whale ? Since Calypso is the water planet and in the trailer Aurora is just next to it, maybe we will know more when Let Someone go will be released as next single ... ?? 

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When I listened to Coloratura this part intrigued me...

 

And all the satellites imbue
The purple, yellow, green, red, orange and the blue
Oh, it's a crazy world, it's true

They made sure to single out that color, it could be thematically worked well with the song but it also could be a nod to Aurora. Aurora is a blue planet. The only issue I have is the song's use of satellite term. 

Had to look it up for research:

. . . a planet is a body orbiting a star that is big enough to be rounded by its gravity, not massive to cause a thermonuclear reaction. A satellite is an object in space that orbits or circles around a larger object.

[ Source: byjus  website ]

Maybe Aurora is a natural space satellite. I'll have to see if there's any more clues on the CD set. 

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During the stationhead Q&A this week, Phil said that Aurora was a planet that did not quite belong with the spheres but that he couldn't say more at the moment.

So i'm definitely thinking it was supposed to be on MOTS vol1 but they removed it from the tracklist at the last minute. It's possible that at the moment they are seriously considering putting it on vol2.

Another theory I've seen online is that this could be another collaboration with BTS, but this time with either Chris or Coldplay featuring on a BTS song. This theory is supported by the fact that, apparently, the deal with BTS collaborations usually involves 2 songs. Another element to support that theory would be the whale, which isseen as a reference to BTS.

For me that whale could also simply be a reference to the planet, as a planet covered in water for instance.

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It doesn't make any sense not releasing the Aurora song on Vol I. since the album cover and Overtura feature it. Plus, Phil was the one who pointed out the planet's existence for us, no one had asked him about it before, so they must release it asap. I don't care if it is an ambient music, instrumental, whatever it is... Just release it, please lol

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On 10/24/2021 at 11:32 AM, dxm3557 said:

It doesn't make any sense not releasing the Aurora song on Vol I. since the album cover and Overtura feature it. Plus, Phil was the one who pointed out the planet's existence for us, no one had asked him about it before, so they must release it asap. I don't care if it is an ambient music, instrumental, whatever it is... Just release it, please lol

Where in Overtura does it show up?

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On 10/24/2021 at 8:44 AM, nowayme said:

I agree, what Phil says is pure marketing garbage. Just release the track and we'll act like what you said never happened.

Have to agree here.

It would be neat if they released the Aurora song as first as a free music-download on the official Coldplay website for like 2 days only ( a span of 48 hours ) then afterwards have it available to buy for purchase on music streaming platforms. 

They might push it into Vol.2 however it would make more logic ro release it sooner.

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What if they were referring to this?:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora

"Most of the planets in the Solar System, some natural satellites, brown dwarfs, and even comets also host auroras".

"Colors and wavelengths of auroral light:Edit

  • Red: At its highest altitudes, excited atomic oxygen emits at 630¬†nm (red); low concentration of atoms and lower sensitivity of eyes at this wavelength make this color visible only under more intense solar activity. The low number of oxygen atoms and their gradually diminishing concentration is responsible for the faint appearance of the top parts of the "curtains". Scarlet, crimson, and carmine are the most often-seen hues of red for the auroras.
  • Green: At lower altitudes, the more frequent collisions suppress the 630¬†nm (red) mode: rather the 557.7¬†nm emission (green) dominates. A fairly high concentration of atomic oxygen and higher eye sensitivity in green make green auroras the most common. The excited molecular nitrogen (atomic nitrogen being rare due to the high stability of the N2¬†molecule) plays a role here, as it can transfer energy by collision to an oxygen atom, which then radiates it away at the green wavelength. (Red and green can also mix together to produce pink or yellow hues.) The rapid decrease of concentration of atomic oxygen below about 100¬†km is responsible for the abrupt-looking end of the lower edges of the curtains. Both the 557.7 and 630.0¬†nm wavelengths correspond to¬†forbidden transitions¬†of atomic oxygen, a slow mechanism responsible for the graduality (0.7¬†s and 107¬†s respectively) of flaring and fading.
  • Blue: At yet lower altitudes, atomic oxygen is uncommon, and molecular nitrogen and ionized molecular nitrogen take over in producing visible light emission, radiating at a large number of wavelengths in both red and blue parts of the spectrum, with 428¬†nm (blue) being dominant. Blue and purple emissions, typically at the lower edges of the "curtains", show up at the highest levels of solar activity.[23]¬†The molecular nitrogen transitions are much faster than the atomic oxygen ones.
  • Ultraviolet: Ultraviolet radiation from auroras (within the optical window but not visible to virtually all[clarification needed]humans) has been observed with the requisite equipment. Ultraviolet auroras have also been seen on Mars,[24]¬†Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Infrared: Infrared radiation, in wavelengths that are within the optical window, is also part of many auroras.[24][25]
  • Yellow and pink are¬†a mix¬†of red and green or blue. Other shades of red, as well as orange, may be seen on rare occasions; yellow-green is moderately common.[clarification needed]¬†As red, green, and blue are the primary colors of additive synthesis of colors, in theory, practically any color might be possible, but the ones mentioned in this article comprise a virtually exhaustive list".

"There is a color differential with altitude; at high altitudes oxygen red dominates, then oxygen green and nitrogen blue/purple/red, then finally nitrogen blue/purple/red when collisions prevent oxygen from emitting anything. Green is the most common color. Then comes pink, a mixture of light green and red, followed by pure red, then yellow (a mixture of red and green), and finally, pure blue".

"Both Jupiter and Saturn have magnetic fields that are stronger than Earth's (Jupiter's equatorial field strength is 4.3 Gauss, compared to 0.3 Gauss for Earth), and both have extensive radiation belts. Auroras have been observed on both gas planets, most clearly using the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Cassini and Galileo spacecraft, as well as on Uranus and Neptune".

Edited by The Philosopher
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35 minutes ago, The Philosopher said:

What if they were referring to this?:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurora

"Most of the planets in the Solar System, some natural satellites, brown dwarfs, and even comets also host auroras".

"Colors and wavelengths of auroral light:Edit

  • Red: At its highest altitudes, excited atomic oxygen emits at 630¬†nm (red); low concentration of atoms and lower sensitivity of eyes at this wavelength make this color visible only under more intense solar activity. The low number of oxygen atoms and their gradually diminishing concentration is responsible for the faint appearance of the top parts of the "curtains". Scarlet, crimson, and carmine are the most often-seen hues of red for the auroras.
  • Green: At lower altitudes, the more frequent collisions suppress the 630¬†nm (red) mode: rather the 557.7¬†nm emission (green) dominates. A fairly high concentration of atomic oxygen and higher eye sensitivity in green make green auroras the most common. The excited molecular nitrogen (atomic nitrogen being rare due to the high stability of the N2¬†molecule) plays a role here, as it can transfer energy by collision to an oxygen atom, which then radiates it away at the green wavelength. (Red and green can also mix together to produce pink or yellow hues.) The rapid decrease of concentration of atomic oxygen below about 100¬†km is responsible for the abrupt-looking end of the lower edges of the curtains. Both the 557.7 and 630.0¬†nm wavelengths correspond to¬†forbidden transitions¬†of atomic oxygen, a slow mechanism responsible for the graduality (0.7¬†s and 107¬†s respectively) of flaring and fading.
  • Blue: At yet lower altitudes, atomic oxygen is uncommon, and molecular nitrogen and ionized molecular nitrogen take over in producing visible light emission, radiating at a large number of wavelengths in both red and blue parts of the spectrum, with 428¬†nm (blue) being dominant. Blue and purple emissions, typically at the lower edges of the "curtains", show up at the highest levels of solar activity.[23]¬†The molecular nitrogen transitions are much faster than the atomic oxygen ones.
  • Ultraviolet: Ultraviolet radiation from auroras (within the optical window but not visible to virtually all[clarification needed]humans) has been observed with the requisite equipment. Ultraviolet auroras have also been seen on Mars,[24]¬†Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Infrared: Infrared radiation, in wavelengths that are within the optical window, is also part of many auroras.[24][25]
  • Yellow and pink are¬†a mix¬†of red and green or blue. Other shades of red, as well as orange, may be seen on rare occasions; yellow-green is moderately common.[clarification needed]¬†As red, green, and blue are the primary colors of additive synthesis of colors, in theory, practically any color might be possible, but the ones mentioned in this article comprise a virtually exhaustive list".

Aurora in some languages is also the condition of sunrays in the moment immediately before or after the dawn, it deals with the end of darkness (don't ask for details, I can't explain it better as I'm not an expert). I don't know if this makes any sense, but I haven't thought about this before reading the last post

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