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🏆 VOTE COLDPLAY AT THE MTV EMA'S 🏆

Brook

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Brook last won the day on October 13 2019

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About Brook

  • Rank
    You're a Sky Full of Stars
  • Birthday 12/25/1998

Converted

  • Favourite Coldplay member?
    Chris
  • Your favourite Coldplay album?
    AROBTTH
  • Favourite Coldplay song
    The Scientist
  1. The musicajourneys account has been deleted now. By the user or is it a cover up maybe? Haha
  2. As Kirboh told us on Discord beforehand, a show in LA was announced on Monday 20th January. I think he is an actual insider because he said there would be an announcement today about a show on Monday 20th and then there was...
  3. The band have unfortunately confirmed that the Daft Punk rumour was a hoax (on the French radio interview). Well done, Kirboh! The band has noticed you.
  4. https://www.thelineofbestfit.com/reviews/albums/coldplay-everyday-life-album-review 8/10 from the lineofbestfit dot com! Reviews so far looking good. Line Of Best Fit REVIEW: On an expansive, emotional, epic gauntlet, Coldplay are a far cry from the band who rang in this decade, and they’re all the better for it. The name Coldplay has become synonymous with a push and pull dichotomy. Over their extensive, and let's be frank, impressive career where they've gone from sad college boys to multi-Glastonbury headliners who can take any stadium and sell it out; the road travelled has been one rife with critique. Eight years ago Coldplay became a band completely entrenched in constructing an immovable fortress of mainstream choruses, after making their name as indie everymen. They started this decade with a bold move into a bombastic idea runway; filled with bright colours and Beyoncé guest spots. And they're ending it with a cinematic sonic scape that pitches everything from driven folk, gospel, wild jazz sax solos, and indie sincerity. Split into two parts, Sunrise and Sunset; Everyday Life is as much a concept about the complex natures of humanity as it is a way for Coldplay to delve into their reserved pulse. Even for a band that have held emotional substance heart-on-sleeve, opening the Sunrise half of the album with a poignant string arrangement is a bit 'on the nose'. Still, given that what it opens is the gates to a sprawling cinematic adventure, it does feel somewhat fitting. "Church" is where the pulse quickens and undulating synths creep upward, it all feels like the world waking, and this is ultimately the message that Everyday Life delivers. The pieces that make up the puzzle. The most explosive of which, "Arabesque" rife with horn-laden crescendos erupt with a rattling battalion of noise. One of the most emotionally drawing moments; digging deep into the psyche of the trauma that can come from an absent parent, the dry, piano-led "Daddy", a ballad of a child yearning for its father. And then they bust out "When I Need A Friend" which goes full choral, aided by atmospheric rain as the apt Sunrise closer. Given it's a two-act play, the end of the first half, while suited, seems a natural closer to the entire spectacle but kicking off round two, "Guns" is a fast-paced acoustic-driven folk number that has a heart of wide-eyed disbelief at the state of the world. Sunset is where things fall to a quieter timbre, but the humanitarian exploration is far from flat. On "Champion Of The World"; a vast sounding, nineties drawn-out cut, Coldplay touches upon romance. Rounding everything off, the titular closer holds a house of mirrors up to the life of both Chris Martin, Coldplay, and the world, and roots the subdued grandiosity of the seventeen tracks before it in a simple idea that asks the question - how? How do we survive as a species in a world we want to destroy, how do we love when we hurt, how do we see when the lights are off? Big questions after having gone through a previous seventeen tracks. At times it can feel like the party's over, especially given the full focus Coldplay have had over the years on pivoting from euphoric BBC-sporting-moment-highlight instrumental from sad-boy piano indie. Still, if you can get over the fact that the cannon of coloured powder are nowhere to be seen, then the results are rewarding. Coldplay are a band who explore. Be it the origins of their emotional landscape, or the shallow depths of the mainstream world or even the actual vibrancy; every effort has been made to create an audible spectacle. And gaze on as a band who've evolved into an unstoppable entity carry on their organic exploration.
  5. The Telegraph Review: Singing with gentle sorrow about repression, conflict and racism on the mellifluous Trouble in Town, Coldplay frontman Chris Martin interrupts his litany of despair to softly proclaim: “Oh my goodness, there’s blood on the beat.” It may be the politest and most English cri de coeur ever laid down on record, and yet no less effective for it. Perhaps because goodness is at the very heart of Coldplay, a band who believe in the power of music to uplift and transform, who play as if they can save the world with a melody. As the quartet deftly change gear, opening out into a wild, free-flowing jazzy tumble beneath a news recording of an aggressive US policeman, the effect is gripping and devastating, because it feels like the politest band on earth being pushed to the very end of their tether. Like their heroes U2, Coldplay are so utterly sincere and entirely lacking in the couldn’t-give-a-damn posturing that passes for coolness in rock culture, you sometimes feel you have to apologise for liking them. Which is ridiculous given all they have achieved. They are one of the greatest British bands of this century, and certainly the most popular. Starting with Parachutes in 2000, Coldplay have released seven multi-million selling albums, their atmospheric and emotional singalong anthems filling stadiums. But where do you go when you are already one of the biggest bands in the world? Even bigger is not always better. Everyday Life is a double album, 16 songs spread over 53 minutes, with the first half titled Sunrise and the second Sunset. Doubles can be a risky format, hinting at self-indulgence and lack of editorial control. Yet the extra running length can also provide breathing space for musicians to experiment outside their usual parameters, classic examples being the Beatles’ White Album, London Calling by the Clash and (less successfully) U2 on Rattle and Hum. Everyday Life belongs on this hallowed ground. It feels organic, analogue and playful as Coldplay dip into different musical genres, trying their hands at choral, classical, gospel, blues, folk, African funk and a blissful slice of doo wop on Cry Cry Cry, with Martin pitched against his own varispeed falsetto. It is often rough around the edges, linked by snatches of field recordings, with a feel of real instruments being played rather than swept up in panoramic pop productions. Nevertheless, there is just enough to maintain Coldplay’s sense of epic grandeur on a handful of widescreen anthems. Church, Orphans, Champion of the World and the title track use a broad spread of world music influences to reinforce key messages of empathy, unity and shared humanity in times of trouble, when “everyone dreams and everyone doubts/ Got to keep dancing when the lights go out.” It is, as ever, heart-on-sleeve stuff, with all of Coldplay’s musical diversions bound together by Martin’s golden gift for melody, almost simplistically direct lyrics and emotive crooning. But, oh my goodness, you’d have to be made of sterner stuff than I to resist. Everyday Life is released by Columbia on November 22
  6. So you're saying if Everyday Life isn't nominated tomorrow then it can't be nominated next year? Really? Wow.
  7. Grammy nominations for 2019 are announced tomorrow (20th). So unless Everyday Life can be nominated despite coming out 2 days after, and LP9 comes out next year and is also grammy-worthy, then we could potentially see TWO Coldplay albums receiving nominations at the 2021 Grammy's! Hahaha
  8. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/what-to-listen-to/coldplay-everyday-life-review-16-heart-on-sleeve-songs-one-greatest/ The Telegraph gives a full review of Everyday Life and rates it a 5/5. This is how they rated other albums: MX - 4/5 GS - 3/5 AHFOD - 3/5
  9. Brook

    Unnamed LP9 Thread

    Even after 8 albums, people still don't see that Coldplay don't do the same thing twice. There will be no AHFOD 2 or MX 2 or VLV 2 etc etc. If they're doing a 9th album, it'll be something different, again. Sure there are always similarities between albums, but it will be different enough that you can hear the song and know it's from LP9.
  10. You've got to have huge guts to book flights and accommodation without knowing if you'll get tickets or not...
  11. Will be trying to get tickets and going! Keeping low expectations that I can actually get tickets because of high demand but fingers crossed!
  12. Someone posted this poll for favourite song excluding the singles from the Discord: [MEDIA=strawpoll]18931204[/MEDIA] View: https://www.strawpoll.me/18931204 Seems people really like Trouble in Town! I think my favourite from the album is Arabesque or Church.
  13. Love the song. Also to all the people complaining about the ending: Just watch the ending of Everyday Life transition smoothly straight into Sunrise. (Like Death and All His Friends into Life in Technicolor)
  14. Wow...just wow... Agree with everyone about Orphans. It’s a fantastic pop song. It’s like it’s from AHFOD but the production and mixing are actually good! And Arabesque....just that last minute is incredible. The rest of the song is so so good. It’s such a different Coldplay but it’s really good change. Can’t wait for everyone to hear it and can’t wait for the rest of the album!
  15. If anyone wants the leaked snippets, you can add me on Discord: Sriracha#5412
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