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Angels & Airwaves


jason41483

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tom delonge (former blink 182 guitarist) has a new band called angels & airwaves. their album "we don't need to whisper" is due out in late may and the first single "the adventure" has been on the radio a bit lately. anybody hear it? i think it's really good. darker and more emotional sound much like blink's last album.

 

i've downloaded that song and another song from the album...i like what i hear so far. always been a fan of blink and box car racer and stuff...glad he's still making solid music.

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Awesome. =) I've heard about his side project' date=' but I haven't heard any of their songs yet. I wonder what ever happened to his other band Box Car Racer?...[/size']

 

I remeber that band! They had this one song that I liked for it's cutesy lyrics...what was it called...? There is....

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  • 2 months later...
it seemed like another comment designed to agitate. but we'll leave it at that.

 

what's wrong if people argue about a band? what's wrong if people share different opinions? you seem to be very sick that i reviewed BH&R, in turn i just wanted to argue. you overreacted and called me wanker (yes you did with "RH fans" statement). i seriously can't believe why does it bother you when some fans don't like your fave band. i'm always happy to discuss anything about Radiohead, Coldplay, Sigur Ros etc. critics or hails it doesn't matter

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i'm quite happy to discuss with others if they don't like a band. but you are going over the top. i'm not answering your post in your 'review' thread and i'm not going to start an argument here.

 

you haven't said anything constructive about why you don't like muse and now why you think AVA is the worst album of the year and you reply to my posts by swearing and calling me a cunt.

 

it is completely pointless arguing with a mindless idiot and i've had enough.

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i'm quite happy to discuss with others if they don't like a band. but you are going over the top. i'm not answering your post in your 'review' thread and i'm not going to start an argument here.

 

you haven't said anything constructive about why you don't like muse and now why you think AVA is the worst album of the year and you reply to my posts by swearing and calling me a cunt.

 

it is completely pointless arguing with a mindless idiot and i've had enough of it.

 

well, you just make me laugh. you can't argue at all. seriously, how do you act in the real life?

 

you called me a wanker first, you just too afraid to admit it. you still seem to be a weak person who needs help when it comes to argument. you still can't handle any critics. you still can't defend Muse and you still attacking me.

 

have a nice life, fucking moron :)

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well, you just make me laugh. you can't argue at all. seriously, how do you act in the real life?

 

you called me a wanker first, you just too afraid to admit it. you still seem to be a weak person who needs help when it comes to argument. you still can't handle any critics. you still can't defend Muse and you still attacking me.

 

have a nice life, fucking moron :)

 

ok kids play nice.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 3 months later...

Singer blinked and missed life's priorities

 

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Tom DeLonge remembers the way people used to listen to music in the pre-iPod days, sitting on the floor in a candle- or black-lighted room, wearing a potent pair of earphones plugged into a real stereo rig, immersed in sound, album covers scattered all around.

 

As he was nearing 30, he realized his platinum-plated pop-punk band Blink-182 wasn't making the kind of records that lend themselves to such an intimate, reflective listening environment. At the same time, he also snapped to the fact that touring was taking away from his family life.

 

When DeLonge and bandmates Mark Hoppus and Travis Barker announced that Blink was taking a break in 2005, no one knew how permanent that vacation would become — except for the front man. But the awful truth — awful for Blink fans, at least — became apparent when DeLonge announced the formation of his new band, Angels and Airwaves, later that year.

 

"Well, (hiatus) was just a nice term for the fact the band was breaking up," DeLonge said of his former outfit, talking from a New York City hotel room where he was packing for the next leg of a tour with AAA.

 

"But it was all just about having a family. I guess I was 28 or 29 at the time, and I had a 2-year-old daughter and I'd missed the first two years of her life. And there were a bunch of problems in the band anyways, just from being together for so long and not really communicating and understanding each other."

 

After all, DeLonge and Hoppus were still teenagers in the San Diego suburbs when they formed Blink 182 in 1993.

 

"It was just one of those things where I think almost, like, if you started dating a girl in high school, and then you find yourself a decade later, and you just are different people, you know, with different priorities. And my priority at the time was my family."

 

Obviously, at some point, having a band became a priority again, as DeLonge began longing to make music that reflected his new maturity, music that required listening and even thinking. To this end, he gathered around him guitarist David Kennedy from DeLonge's old side project Box Car Racer, ex-Distillers bassist Ryan Sinn, and former Rocket From the Crypt and Offspring drummer Atom Willard.

 

When they entered DeLonge's home studio, the lead singer/guitarist already had the place tricked out to create the proper mood for the music Angels and Airwaves would attempt to make.

 

"We just wanted to create an atmosphere that was conducive to where we were going with the record," he said. "And so we would do things like always have the shades down and dimmed lights in the studio, and we would have the whole place littered with photographs of World War II, and then giant television screens playing images of the future — old Stanley Kubrick movies or whatever."

 

What emerged from those strange atmospheric conditions was "We Don't Need to Whisper," an ambitious, high-concept, 10-track song cycle that bears little resemblance to the rowdy, bathroom-humored, school-boy antics of Blink 182, but a strong likeness to the loftier words and music of artists such as U2, Peter Gabriel and Coldplay, bringing delayed guitars and batteries of electronic keyboards into play to underscore DeLonge's lyrical imagery of war, love and salvation.

 

"It's kind of a metaphor about what I went through over the past couple of years, because the breakup of the band was pretty monumental for me," he said. "I know a lot of people out there go through a lot heavier and weightier things. But for me, it was a tremendous learning experience, for me to walk away from a band that sold 25 million records, sold out arenas across the world. To walk away from that, you know, for my family was like an incredible experience."

 

To learn more about the emotional impact of DeLonge's Blink-182 break-up experience, check out the new band he formed to relate that experience, in concert Monday night in the Coca-Cola Bricktown Events Center. But don't expect the kind of half-naked clowning around Blink used to indulge in onstage.

 

"There's still a lot of jokes and stuff," he laughed. "I am me, and I haven't abandoned who I am at all. But it definitely is a more pure picture of who I am."

 

For those interested in checking out Angels and Airwaves' "We Don't Need to Whisper," DeLonge recommends the old-fashioned way of listening to a new album.

 

"When people make a movie, they might spend a year or two, and then you go watch it, you sit in a seat, it's dark, and you pay attention," he said. "I love the idea of bands challenging themselves to have their listeners do that ... I never want people driving their cars in traffic, on the cell phone, trying to cue in to an FM station and barely hearing the song.

 

"I much rather would have 'em go home and sit down and put on some headphones and turn off the lights and really do what kids used to do back in the day, when they'd put their albums on the floor and listen to the music."

 

http://www.newsok.com/article/2965587/

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