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Mylo Xyloto 320kbps torrent (NO LINKS)


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Hey there.

 

I've converted the FLAC files to .mp3 earlier and got now a +100MB file to share via torrent. Torrent's a far better way of sharing than regular internet files hoster: the archive spread and do not get deleted, and the more people engage in downloading, the faster the sharing occurs.

 

If you are not accustomed to exchange files via torrent yet, follow the instruction:

 

- Download this very tiny program to be able to receive the torrent.

 

- Once you downloaded and installed the program above (or if you already had a bittorrent client installed) reply to this thread to receive the torrent download link via PM.

 

 

 

 

 

(EDIT: Well, since the link I'm sharing DOES NOT provide the download of the files directly, I think there is no problem about sharing it openly. Nobody is gonna get the files from this link, but from the other link this link links. :laugh3: I gotta sleep and will not be able to PM all the requests in the next hours, so I'm putting it right here, however, if it does offend the forum rules, please, admin, delete these parenthesis! Here it go: tinyurl.com/MXJapanTor. Have a good seeding night. :))

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My mom's computer filter doesn't let me download torrents (I know, I know...). Is their anyway you could put it on mediafire or rapidshare as well?

 

Ya, I'll do this, but it will take a while considering I'm seeding the torrent, so the bandwidth will be splitted. But hold on, my PC will work all the night long to make everybody happy :lol:

 

Why not listen to the flac version? It's lossless.

 

'Cause it is not portable. I can carry my iPod anywhere I go.

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If you're worried about the iPod and quality, iPods will take Apple Lossless files fine, so you need to turn the FLAC into an uncompressed WAV (Audacity should do it), import it into iTunes, set your Import Codec in Settings to Apple Lossless and then convert those files to APL Lossless. Bang. Lossless iPod files for easy listening.

 

Now it should be mentioned that the quality of output of an iPod, regardless of headphones or speakers, may not be up to the challenge of producing the full range of definition offered by lossless files. I, for one, can usually not tell the difference between lossless and 320kbps (not VBR) with my Studio Beats (a pretty good pair of headphones). Through my laptop, it's a different story.

 

Best of luck. In fact, I might just make a Apple Lossless version for myself to hear the difference!

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If you're worried about the iPod and quality, iPods will take Apple Lossless files fine, so you need to turn the FLAC into an uncompressed WAV (Audacity should do it), import it into iTunes, set your Import Codec in Settings to Apple Lossless and then convert those files to APL Lossless. Bang. Lossless iPod files for easy listening.

 

Now it should be mentioned that the quality of output of an iPod, regardless of headphones or speakers, may not be up to the challenge of producing the full range of definition offered by lossless files. I, for one, can usually not tell the difference between lossless and 320kbps (not VBR) with my Studio Beats (a pretty good pair of headphones). Through my laptop, it's a different story.

 

Best of luck. In fact, I might just make a Apple Lossless version for myself to hear the difference!

 

You're probably right, I don't know that far about compression. But there are, yet, people who play media through the smart or cellphone, though, none of these enhanced and fancy files are accepted, right?

 

:D

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You're probably right, I don't know that far about compression. But there are, yet, people who play media through the smart or cellphone, though, none of these enhanced and fancy files are accepted, right?

 

:D

 

Some are. As I said, iPods, iPhones and the like will take and play Apple Lossless quite nicely, and some Android phones can be coaxed into playing FLAC straight. The problem I can conceive lies in the quality of the components used to create the port, the DSP (Digital Signal Processing) chip or software used to process the signal sent to the headphones, and so on. I would imagine that most phones will play to at least 256kbps nicely, especially iPods that Apple sells 256kbps files for now in order to show increased quality. Even 320kbps, I'm sure, will add an even clearer sound to your songs. Whether or not we could even perceive something at 1000kbps or more is something I don't lnow enough about, but I would imagine that, given what files these phones are created with in mind to be played, I'd imagine the components are not chosen with lossless playing in mind. Laptops and such are probably a different story.

 

This is not to say that lossless is not a great thing. Its my belief that one should always opt for lossless over anything. Then you can decide what to compress it to, and you will always have a direct copy of how the song was mixed and intended for posterity, or at least until you buy those kick ass headphones and sound processing equipment :D

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Its my belief that one should always opt for lossless over anything. Then you can decide what to compress it to, and you will always have a direct copy of how the song was mixed and intended for posterity, or at least until you buy those kick ass headphones and sound processing equipment :D

 

 

Yes! It should really be like that.

 

The curious: when I plug my headphones to the laptop the sound comes ok but very low.

 

When I plug it in my LG Android phone I have a louder music and I can choose even the most appropriate equalizer to the kind of song I'm hearing.

 

So I think we live in a technological era that doesn't discriminates the gadgets anymore, doesn't matter if it's a notebook or a tiny thin phone, the intended and achieved quality may be the same whatever the equipment is. (I just think... :P)

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Yes! It should really be like that.

 

The curious: when I plug my headphones to the laptop the sound comes ok but very low.

 

When I plug it in my LG Android phone I have a louder music and I can choose even the most appropriate equalizer to the kind of song I'm hearing.

 

So I think we live in a technological era that doesn't discriminates the gadgets anymore, doesn't matter if it's a notebook or a tiny thin phone, the intended and achieved quality may be the same whatever the equipment is. (I just think... :P)

 

I couldn't agree more! Most Android phones I've had have a DSP setting app, or something in the music app to allow you to change those things. Motorola's have SRS built in, which is just awesome. You can get the iTunes plugin that does the same (I believe its called iWOW by SRSLabs). As to why its louder, I can only think that it might be because the phone boosts the volume due, in part, to the audio processing unit, or because it does it software-wise in order to boost the incoming call volume to an audible level (phones I've used are notorious for making me put the in-call volume all the way up to even hear anything. The volume boost may be the phone not knowing that you're playing music and it can't recognize the difference. Just a thought, but it sounds plausible to me. Especially since your computer wouldn't have the need.

 

In fact, I experience the same thing. My iPhone goes to half volume (8 or 9/16 of the total) to listen to most things comfortably, but anything above the second out of sixteen notches on my MacBook and I'd be deaf in a few minutes!

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