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Linkin Park


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I loved Linkin Park, Great project. Some really good songs, a bit 'pop/rocky' but ok.

Got some posters of em all in my room, and got all their albums legal. (Except for this,, album *ahum*)

I HATE Jay-z, I'm don't like hip-hop, r&b and rap.

I HATE Jay-z ft. Linkin Park, I think the yo yo yo yeah thing just cracked everything up. The rap thing Jay-z did is really against everything I call music.

I listened to whole the album, but I just hated it.

It's a opinion, and no one can make me happy with this album, I just think it sucks..

 

fair enough.. but to all those who claim to 'hate hip hop'.. hip hop isnt a music... its a culture.. a way of life.... its about b-boying, break dancing, turntables, microphones, and a love for rhyme... I repsect everyone's opinions on this album, and you're right.. you're either gonna love it or hate it.. but please.. dont bash hip hop.. bash the 'crap rappers' that are out today... lol Jay included at times!!

 

common mistake... but I just thought I'd share the knowledge.. :cool:

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  • 7 months later...
  • 1 year later...

We're not just a bunch of kids anymore

 

We went to great distances and lengths to change the sound of the band, discovering how to write songs that didn't corrupt what we'd already created. Linkin Park's frontman on the band's new look & new sound:

 

IT has been a long wait, but Linkin Park is finally back.

 

But it's not the Linkin Park that the world is used to.

 

Four years after the US rock supergroup released its second CD Meteora and 38 million albums sold worldwide later, it is attempting a different sound with the much-anticipated new offering Minutes To Midnight.

 

In fact, it's almost inaccurate to classify the band as nu-metal or rap-rock anymore.

 

Musically, Linkin Park is softer and more stripped down. Lyrically, it's become more serious and socially-conscious.

 

Instead of being angsty over broken relationships, it now tackles world issues like politics, war and the environment. Oh, with a few F-bombs thrown in along the way.

 

And for the first time, the six members - singer Chester Bennington, 31, rapper Mike Shinoda, 30, guitarist Brad Delson, 30, bassist Dave 'Phoenix' Farrell, 30, DJ Joe Hahn, 30, and drummer Rob Bourdon, 28 - appear on the cover of an album.

 

Yes, Linkin Park is taking reinvention further than any hardcore teenage fan would've wanted.

 

Wearing a simple black long-sleeved T-shirt and jeans, charismatic frontman Bennington was holding court in a swish ballroom at KualaLumpur's LeMeridien hotel on Wednesday to tell us more.

 

The band had chosen the Malaysian city to hold an exclusive listening session of all 12 tracks from Minutes To Midnight - which hits shelves on 15May - for the South-east Asian media.

 

While a couple of tracks are classic Linkin Park (heavy banging guitar riffs, catchy choruses and screamy vocals), the rest of the album has a generic pop-rock vibe with influences from U2, Coldplay and even gospel church choirs.

 

Bennington admitted that it was a 'very conscious decision from the beginning' not to recreate the sounds of chart-topping debut album Hybrid Theory and follow-up Meteora, as the California six-piece are 'embarking on a new era of Linkin Park'.

 

He said: 'We didn't want to make a trilogy. We wanted to write a record that didn't restrict us to a certain style and genre.

 

'Yet, we didn't want to stray from things that we felt were essential to Linkin Park, just present them in a different way.

 

'We went to great distances and lengths to change the sound of the band, discovering how to write songs that didn't corrupt what we'd already created.

 

'It was a very difficult process, which is one of the reasons why the new album took so long.'

 

The man instrumental in LinkinPark's metamorphosis is Grammy-winning producer RickRubin, who is behind works by the Dixie Chicks and Red Hot Chili Peppers.

 

He forced the guys to experiment and encouraged them to stay on the path whenever they 'fell back into old patterns'.

 

FORCED TO EXPERIMENT

 

Bennington recalled: 'He told us, 'Whatever you think your fans want to hear, whatever music you think you need to make, whatever limitations you think you have, just forget about it. Throw everything out of the window because none of it matters. What's important is making music you're inspired by'.'

 

Linkin Park's record label Warner Bros insisted the first single had to 'bridge the gap' between the old and new material as 'listeners need something to soften the transition'.

 

The result is What I've Done, an old-school Linkin Park number that is currently playing on the radio.

 

However, the rude awakening arrives when Shinoda, who co-produced the album with Rubin, ends up rapping only on two tracks.

 

Bennington said: 'Mike found himself coming up with ideas that were melodic rather than rapping. He even made a joke that he's writing himself out of the record.

 

'So I suggested that if he's not rapping as much, he should be singing. So he ended up doing a lot of the harmonies and the lead vocal (in one track).'

 

Linkin Park's use of the F-word in several songs is another shocker, especially since it had always prided itself on being a profanity-free rock outfit.

 

So parents out there who intend to buy Minutes To Midnight for your kids, you have been warned.

 

Bennington denied that the expletives were thrown in 'for the sake of shocking people', but his explanation was too lame to be believed.

 

He said: 'In the past, we didn't use any explicit language, not on purpose, but because we always found better ways to express ourselves.

 

'But here, we felt there wasn't any better way than using those words, which fit the thrust of the songs.'

 

He continued to deflect any potential controversy by joking: 'It's kinda fun for me! I am a personal fan of explicit language, I use it as often as possible.'

 

And instead of the intricate artwork or graphic designs that adorned their previous album covers, Minutes To Midnight features the silhouetted sextet looking all spruced-up in suits against the desolate Salton Sea in Southern California.

 

So why have the anonymous men of Linkin Park suddenly come to the forefront?

 

Bennington explained they wanted to celebrate their rare joint effort: 'For the last few years, all six of us really worked on this album as a band, and we've spent more time together than we ever have.'

 

They also wanted to 'elevate' the look of Linkin Park, to appear more 'uniform, like a group' and 'not look like just a bunch of kids'.

 

As for their newfound dapper style, Bennington quipped: 'Well, the band finally let me dress them!'

 

He added: 'We're all grown up and more mature, and I think the guys are feeling comfortable being rock stars. Everyone's coming into their own.'

 

Even the apocalyptic title Minutes To Midnight is an to allusion Linkin Park's metaphorical death and rebirth.

 

It is a reference to the Doomsday Clock, a clock created in 1947 by scientists for the purpose of portraying how close (in imaginary minutes) mankind is to the end of the world (midnight).

 

Bennington said: 'Things need to change, and it needs to happen now. The title captured how we're feeling and where we're heading in the future.'

 

http://newpaper.asia1.com.sg/show/story/0,4136,126866,00.html

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Four years after the US rock supergroup released its second CD Meteora and 38 million albums sold worldwide later, it is attempting a different sound with the much-anticipated new offering Minutes To Midnight.

 

In fact, it's almost inaccurate to classify the band as nu-metal or rap-rock anymore.

 

Musically, Linkin Park is softer and more stripped down. Lyrically, it's become more serious and socially-conscious.

 

Instead of being angsty over broken relationships, it now tackles world issues like politics, war and the environment. Oh, with a few F-bombs thrown in along the way.

 

While a couple of tracks are classic Linkin Park (heavy banging guitar riffs, catchy choruses and screamy vocals), the rest of the album has a generic pop-rock vibe with influences from U2, Coldplay and even gospel church choirs.

 

He said: 'We didn't want to make a trilogy. We wanted to write a record that didn't restrict us to a certain style and genre.

 

'Yet, we didn't want to stray from things that we felt were essential to Linkin Park, just present them in a different way.

 

'We went to great distances and lengths to change the sound of the band, discovering how to write songs that didn't corrupt what we'd already created.

 

The man instrumental in LinkinPark's metamorphosis is Grammy-winning producer RickRubin, who is behind works by the Dixie Chicks and Red Hot Chili Peppers.

 

Even the apocalyptic title Minutes To Midnight is an to allusion Linkin Park's metaphorical death and rebirth.

 

how exciting. i was never a real hardcore linkin park fan but i was surrounded by people who were so some of it rubbed off on me. it was a great way to let of steam without throwing a tantrum - ideal for the average teen i suppose lol

 

anyway i'm looking forward to their new album, rick rubin and his influences should be interesting, [rchp, justin timberlake etc]. more intriguing is the topics their songs will take, that's what i wanna hear most of all.

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wow... it's been a while since the last time that I listened to them... I have their 2 first albums so It'll be interesting to listen to their music again

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^ don't hold back or anything, or justify that response man :thinking:

 

...

 

 

just saw heard what i've done. it definitely sounds like them, but honestly, time will tell whether it really grows on me. as they said, mike wouldn't be rapping as much and this is seen in this song.

there are a couple of LP tracks i like, a lot i've never heard of, but this, as their first track off their new album, i'd say good for them. the clip itself has a lot packed into it, definitely making a statement and very political, you go from personal dilemmas to problems of the world. just a lot to really absorb but a good clip nonetheless.

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I don't need to justify it. There's so much fucking shitty music out there, and Linkin Park is a part of it.

 

then don't. but if you want to give your opinion and have people take it seriously, or even listen to it, you may wanna actually say why . or not, anyway doesn't matter now.

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then don't. but if you want to give your opinion and have people take it seriously, or even listen to it, you may wanna actually say why . or not, anyway doesn't matter now.

 

 

 

I'm gonna butt in here...there is no reason really...the very fact that you need to ask why is sad in itself...they are a bunch of talentless asses!!!

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I'm gonna butt in here...there is no reason really...the very fact that you need to ask why is sad in itself...they are a bunch of talentless asses!!!

 

if you read my post, or posts rather, again you will understand what i am saying rather than assuming. i'm not a hardcore LP fan, nor do i know any song of theirs not played on the radio/tv, but if someone is going to say crap about a band and not back it up, like he has and you just did, of course you're going to get people asking why you'd say that, and neither of you have done that - "there is no reason really" - that means absolutely nothing. so asking is not sad, it's expected.

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