Learn Assorted Languages With Assorted Coldplayers

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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For those learning French, Le Petit Nicolas and Le Petit Prince (audio files and text) are easy to find and very enjoyable readings.

I'm reading 'Schaum's Outline of French Grammar'. It's very detailed (in terms of number of rules, but not necessarily within a rule) and easy to understand. It may be a good guide once you grasp some vocabulary and grammatical rules (if you're in the beginning of the process, you may get confused with so many new expressions). It's organised by syntactic categories (nouns, verbs, adjectives etc), so it's helping to have a more systematic understanding of the language.
 

Phoebeo

Hi. I'm Louise.
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There are about 185 pages on this thread. Any chance that there is someone who can learn me a bit German? I know some basis German, and I think I know which words to put either, Das, Der,Die in front of.. But I suck at the language. :shame: Anyone willing to help me?
 

iccp

lovin' each day
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Jun 28, 2006
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For those learning French, Le Petit Nicolas and Le Petit Prince (audio files and text) are easy to find and very enjoyable readings.

I'm reading 'Schaum's Outline of French Grammar'. It's very detailed (in terms of number of rules, but not necessarily within a rule) and easy to understand. It may be a good guide once you grasp some vocabulary and grammatical rules (if you're in the beginning of the process, you may get confused with so many new expressions). It's organised by syntactic categories (nouns, verbs, adjectives etc), so it's helping to have a more systematic understanding of the language.


where can you get some audio online that one can download?
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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^Well, it's the same way you search for other files, like albums and stuff. But I've already seen Le Petit Nicolas on youtube. It's not difficult to find.
 

Abracadabra

I'm good at bad ideas
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Yesterday I had my very first french lesson and it was AMAZING. I mean, c'etait magnifique! :cheesy: I think I'm going to enjoy this so much. I was also recommended 'Le Petit Nicolas' and seeing this here definitely makes me want to read it.
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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^A bit late to the conversation, but I'm glad you're enjoying your classes!

Under 'spoiler' is something that may be useful to people interested in checking how sounds in the language being learned are produced:

For anyone who, like me, struggles with pronunciation, try googling [insert language here]+IPA+wikipedia.

'IPA' stands for 'International Phonetic Alphabet', which is basically an organised set of symbols to represent sounds that the human vocal system can produce. It's international because its symbols are supposed to represent the sounds that constitutes any human/natural language, regardless of its writing system (if it is represented by a writing system at all).

The page for the French sounds, for example, is this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Help:IPA_for_French

You can then click on the sounds you're interested in. You'll be redirected to the entry that corresponds to that sound, where a recording will be available.

A nice thing is that there's a list of graphemes (or clusters of graphemes used to represent a sound, which is quite nice if you're learning French - there isn't a very neat one-to-one correspondence between what is written and what's pronounced.

You can also visit http://www.yorku.ca/earmstro/ipa/index.html and access an IPA table, where you can click in sounds and here samples of them.

Basically, the table is organised as follows: on the horizontal axis, the sounds are classified by the way they are produced; on the vertical one, there are the articulators used to produce the sound (tip of tongue against front teeth; back of tongue against soft palate etc etc). It may be helpful to understand the way the sound is produced if, again like me, you're kinda deaf.
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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Just a quick note: "Teach yourself"



and "Berlitz"



(available in many languages; French is just an example)

are quite useful for those trying to learn a language by themselves. CDs with audiofiles are available, which is very important to practise listening and to improve pronunciation.
 

bubbleymonki

Livin' life in Technicolor
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Jun 20, 2011
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How about sign language?? I'm currently taking a course in American Sign Language and was thinking of signing songs to help me practice it. But I could use some tips.. :uhoh2:
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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^ASL sounds like an interesting thing to learn!

A professor of mine showed us a documentary about a sign language used in France. In the beginning, people were reciting some poem in this SL. Maybe you could find something of this nature on youtube?

edit: This is it:

[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-Ev68AmEXM"]País dos Surdos Coral - YouTube[/ame]

Whole movie is here (Spanish subtitles).
 

bubbleymonki

Livin' life in Technicolor
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^ Sign language is beautiful! It's a very expressive language. Signing a poem sounds a great idea.
Thanks for sharing the movie to me, happy to see it has English subtitles too. :) So far, I watched a bit of it and I noticed a few signs in French are similar in ASL (deaf and name)... Just remembered that ASL does share some similar signs with French Sign Language.
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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^Didn't notice English subtitles were also available. I think I assumed it was just Spanish because the title of the video is in Spanish.

Is the 'deaf' sign some sort of movement from your ear towards your mouth with your forefinger? I *think* it's something like this in Brazilian SL.

Hope you can find something in ASL on youtube or something that helps you!
 

bubbleymonki

Livin' life in Technicolor
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Yeah you're right, that's the sign for deaf. In ASL it's slightly different though, it starts with an index finger towards to the mouth to the ear... I didn't know it's the same in Brazilian SL too. Interesting!

Thanks! There are some youtube and web videos for SL that are quite helpful. But I'm still learning the basics, translating a song will be a challenge.
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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[ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7x_SZ4foEBA"]15 Tintin au pays de l or noir 0 - YouTube[/ame]

:awesome:
 

Foreplay

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dont think anybody out of there would like to learn probably the hardest and least attractive language - cantonese ..
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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How hard a language is is a relative notion - for one thing, it depends on the mother tongue of the individual. I'd suppose that a person who knows Mandarin Chinese would find it less hard to learn Cantonese than would, for example, a person who speaks a romance language.

Do you speak Cantonese? :)
 

Foreplay

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How hard a language is is a relative notion - for one thing, it depends on the mother tongue of the individual. I'd suppose that a person who knows Mandarin Chinese would find it less hard to learn Cantonese than would, for example, a person who speaks a romance language.

Do you speak Cantonese? :)
yeah its true ... i do speak cantonese and its my first language
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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那么,我很高兴认识你!

Hope that it isn't too wrong. In any case, I meant that I'm glad to get to know seeing that I don't think we've spoken before :D
 

Foreplay

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Absolutely perfect in spite of you wrote in mandarin (used to learn it in primary school and high school)

那么(So),我(I)很高兴(so happy)认识你(to meet you) !

Looks like nonsense but thats how chinese works lol :)

I will show you how i would say them in my language(cantonese)later I cant type any cantonese at the moment

Anyways its a good beginning :laugh3:
 

bubbleymonki

Livin' life in Technicolor
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my family speaks Cantonese. I forgot it when I had to learn English when I was in kindergarten so I only know a little.
 

suzanafg

Stand tall, bipedal ape
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So does mine =D But I switch it with Portuguese (which is my mother tongue) a lot.

I thought Cantonese was written with the same script used with Mandarin Chinese. I am terribly sorry!

@bubbleymonki How are your ASL classes going, btw?
 
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